Reflection on Formative Feedback for Textiles 1: A Textiles Vocabulary: Assignment 3

Formative Feedback from Cari, my tutor, followed by my reflection.

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Overall Comments

A playful, varied and well-crafted body of work.

Research (including sketchbooks and samples)
Context, reflective thinking, analysis, Demonstration of technical and Visual Skills, Demonstration of Creativity
Your research throughout this module has been meticulous, from your initial analysis and deconstruction of what the section entailed (detailed in your blog) to your detailed colour mixing and careful crafting of your collages.
You’ve balanced this carefulness with some lovely playfulness. I love your response to ex.3.1, pt.2 where the stripes emerge from the frame of the fabric to meander out towards the viewer.
The yarn wraps are also really enticing – there’s a great range of textural, tactile and surface qualities in the wraps. Fibrous yarns sit next to matte and glossier surfaces, which creates a varied, dynamic aesthetic. You’ve carefully translated the colour proportions of the painting, using both traditional and non-traditional materials.
The accompanying tables where you record the material quality and source of the yarns are great – use a similar approach in future to record the ‘technical’ information, so you have a good technical resource for future inspiration.
Your handling of both the gouache and watercolour is careful and your colour mixing generally very good. It’s interesting to read your comments about the effect of the light on the accuracy of the colour. Your crafting is consistently careful with all media and processes, with your collage studies particularly well crafted.
The collages (ex.3.4) are varied and playful. You have thoughtfully translated shape, form and colour information into the 2D collage. Your use of materials to capture the different surface qualities was particularly pleasing (e.g. the glossy surface of glass compared to matte linearity of yarn). Collage #3 was ambitious but the result is really effective.
I particularly liked your translation of the Bali image into textile samples rather than flat swatches of colour.
You’ve matched the colours in found fabric samples well but they also match more than the colour – the tie-dye and diffuse colour of some samples has a sense of tropical holidays, which fit the exotic plants and acid brights within the image.

Learning Logs or Blogs/Critical essays
Context, reflective thinking, critical thinking, analysis
The blog is consistently well laid out, with a good number of suitably sized and appropriately collaged photos.
You use photography well to capture different aspects of the work, e.g. for collage #2 you zoom in to capture an abstract section of colour and shape, which could be translated into a beautiful textile design.
In your contextual research, you use detailed, descriptive language to critique artists and designers use of colour and demonstrate your understanding of colour theory through appropriate use of key terms, e.g. optical mixing.
Your summary succinctly states what you’ve learnt from each designer/artist. Similarly, your review of the colour palette generators was suitably critical, both the functionality and ease of use.
The learning log clearly details the development of the work, with evaluation of successes and weaknesses. You continue to use descriptive language well to explain what you see and the connotations of colours. (e.g. “The strong contrasts gave the resulting palette quite a dramatic look, with the green and yellow adding a feel of early spring – like glimpses of green shoots and primroses on a grey day.”) Your summaries at the end of each post sum
up the work developed but are most insightful when you reflect on what you’ve learnt, e.g. the importance of tone in the collage section.
Your analysis of the yarns wraps focusses more on the process of creating the wraps and the accuracy of the proportions. I wanted to know what you thought about the overall aesthetic of wrap- how do the proportions of colours work together, do the different textures help or distract from the read of the colour, would the wrap translate effectively into textile designs? For example, I find wrap #2 less pleasing because there is too greater a difference in scale between the flat ribbons, the fibrous cream on the right and the gold braid. In contrast, I find #3 too consistent in scale. Yarn wrap #1, with its varied range of textures and surface qualities pleased my eye far more, there is greater nuance both in colour and surface quality. This is subjective, however, so I wanted to know what you thought about the palettes potential as useable colour palettes.

Feedback on assignment
Demonstration of technical and Visual Skills, Quality of Outcome, Demonstration of Creativity
Your colour book very simply but crisply presents the best work. You’ve been selective, careful to present only the best work, and the consistent presentation on a white ground means all the focus is on the work itself. The written descriptions are simple and discrete. Your introduction clearly articulates what you’ve learnt and why you’ve chosen these pieces. Well done! I like the cover but I pondered whether the title square could have better reflected the contents by using some aspect of an aesthetic contained within rather than the rainbow palette.
Your written reflection and self-evaluation against the assessment criteria are thorough and critical. I’m really looking forward to seeing how you develop your use of colour in the next two parts.

Suggested reading/viewing
Context
– Here are a couple of artists/designers whose use of colour excites me:
o Sanne Schuurmann, especially her colour magazine:
http://sanneschuurman.com/portfolio_page/color-magazine)
o Margrethe Odgaard, particularly her Color Diary Japan:
http://margretheodgaard.com/work_post/colour-diary-japan/?ref=w
o Raw Color: http://www.rawcolor.nl/welcome/
o You may have seen this 1692 example of a colour book online but it’s worth sending again even if you have 🙂 http://www.thisiscolossal.com/2014/05/color-book/

Pointers for the next assignment
• Reflect on this feedback in your learning log.
• Ensure you reflect on the overall aesthetic / visual read of your work as well as on the technical aspects.
• Continue to develop colour palettes with gouache and watercolour using the methods you have in this module. Reflect on what mood they communicate to the viewer.
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My reflection on the Formative Feedback, above.

Good

Cari mentioned my thorough research (analysing the course and assignment work on the Learning Log (LL), and in the colour mixing and collage making. A playful approach; enticing qualities in the yarn wraps; good use of technical records; careful handling of paint, and colour mixing generally (!) good. Careful crafting in different media; variety in collage work (especially use of materials linked to surface qualities of source image); selecting appropriate textile samples for an image found in a newspaper.

The LL is well laid out and appropriately illustrated. The contextual research demonstrated understanding of colour theory and learning from the studied artists and designers. Development work is set out and evaluated clearly.

The colour book showed my best work in a simple format, demonstrating good selection skills and consistency in presentation; the introduction and simple labelling were good.

Written reflections and self-evaluation against the criteria were appropriate.

Needs Work

More reflection on what I have learnt in each exercise. For example, yarn wrap exercises concentrated too much on creation and not enough on the overall aesthetic of the wraps (analysis of the proportions, textures, possible translation into textile designs) and potential for using the finished wraps’ colour palettes. Two of the wraps showed too much or too little variation in scale.

The title square logo on the cover was not appropriate to the contents of the colour book.

 

To Do [My updates added in square brackets]

  • Continue to keep technical information tables and samples for future work [ongoing]
  • Translate detail of Collage #2 into a textile design [Textile Design here]
  • Continue to include evaluations and connotations for work (eg colour palettes) [ongoing]
  • Reflect on the learning achieved from each part of the course. [ongoing]
  • Consider the aesthetics, visual read and potential for the work created, as well as strengths/weaknesses. [ongoing]
  • Add some thoughts about the yarn wraps’ potential as useable colour palettes. [edited section added after summary to Yarn Wrap article]
  • Make a new, more appropriate title square and back page logo for the colour book.
  • Develop my use of colour in the next two parts of the course. Continue to make colour palettes in paint for work created. [ongoing]
  • Research Sanne Schuurmann and her colour magazine [Colour Research]
  • Research Margrethe Odgaard and her Color Diary Japan [as above]
  • Study Raw Color [as above]
  • Look at the 1692 colour book [as above]

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