Coursework and Assignment 5: Formative Feedback

Many thanks to Cari for her insightful feedback, which again has provided many pointers for improving my future work.

Cari’s feedback follows and my reflections are below that.


Overall Comments
A beautifully presented resolution to the course, with a clearly documented body of playful development work.

Feedback on assignment
Demonstration of technical and Visual Skills, Quality of Outcome, Demonstration of Creativity

Project 1: Developing Visual Research
You reflected on your previous visual research critically, extracting salient points to build upon. Your early contextual research is good – it is all relevant, focussing on textiles or materials-led work, but sourced from a range of art and design contexts. It’s great that you’ve chosen to focus on the practitioners’ processes rather than outcomes too, to help inform how you work, not just what you create.
You developed a good body of visual research based on your photographic compositions. These photographs are full of colour and form. It would have been good to see the camera lens used to zoom in to capture sections of your still-life or different angles/views, but the overall composition is considered and tested. You’ve employed
a range of media to develop your drawn imagery, some of which is more traditional and representational in nature, others more graphic and stark drawings. The point at which they started straying towards surfaces, rather than still-life drawings, filling the whole page and selecting elements to focus, on was particularly interesting. It was good to see some monochrome and visually quieter imagery amongst the riot of colour that you capture so well. I had hoped for more left-field drawing experiments within this, like the lawnmower drawing developed earlier in the course. In future courses, continue to explore the boundaries of what drawing can be.

Project 2: Building a Response
You’ve selected interesting practitioners whose work relates to natural forms, from both 3D craft and textiles disciplines, which you’ve discussed objectively and in relation to your work.

Some beautifully sensitive surfaces have emerged through your paper manipulation exploration. Through cutting and piercing you’ve invested the materials with more interest and value, which you’ve then photographed beautifully, using light and shadow to alter the surface. Your evaluative drawings during this phase are strong, sensitively translating structure and form.
The sensitivity to texture and pattern continues as you incorporate stitch to create surface patterns and textures.
It was great to see development design drawing playing a part in your exploration of linear forms, particularly for yarn concepts 1 – 3 where multiple ideas were explored on paper. Some really playful linear concept samples have emerged from this investigation, particularly those that incorporate negative space within their form.

Project 3: Experimenting and Taking Risks
This phase sees you logically summarise and review each mini-collection of visual imagery (e.g. tulip, catkin….).
The new samples clearly extend the visual information within your mini-collections, experimenting with the structure, form, pattern and colour. There’s an increasing investment of time and crafting into the samples as you progress through the projects, with high quality delicate textural stitching and detail within these samples.
You’ve explored material qualities well, selecting appropriate found materials or manipulating them to fit your chosen idea.
The strongest mini-collections developed through this project are those in which you’ve developed multiple iterations, visualising the qualities in multiple manifestations. I enjoyed the deceptive subtlety of catkins #10, which required light to energise the details within its surface. Despite the bold colouration of your subject matter, it was great to see such restraint and subtlety in your translation of the subject. The tulip and plum tree
samples are particularly experimental with surface and form, both extending the surface with structural elements and incorporating negative space in the way your linear samples did.
Assignment 5: Capsule Collection
You’ve translated earlier surface qualities well, such as the tufting and cut surfaces, though some of the more playful structural elements haven’t been incorporated. The collection has a more traditional sensibility than the earlier sampling but it forms a coherent and lively body of textiles, showing strong potential for an interior
context.
On one hand I lamented the loss of some of the delicacy and subtly of earlier samples, such as the subtle cut and stitch work of the plum blossom or the delicate extrusions of the early three-dimensional catkin samples, but you have explained on the learning log in project 3 how you have narrowed down to a bolder, abstract, uncluttered,
pattern-led aesthetic, which demonstrates clear active decision making and personal selection.
The final collection is varied in surface and pattern and yet coherent due to the consistency of material and colour palette, the constraints you successfully applied at the beginning of the assignment. Overall the collection demonstrates a sensitivity in the translation of visual research, a sympathetic approach to materials and
techniques, and forms a solid conclusion to the course. That work is presented beautifully in the collections book, referencing methods used and knowledge gleaned earlier in the course.

Sketchbooks
Demonstration of technical and Visual Skills, Demonstration of Creativity
The workbook crisply presents the work but is lacking the organic development of a sketchbook. Because the work has been presented rather explored on the pages, I was conscious of the gaps in between the samples, where ideas had been explored and decisions made but not explored in the book. These gaps are generally filled
in by the learning log commentary but there’s a gap where more immediate, intuitive responses could be. Whilst I felt there were a few gaps in the decision making, there is a clear visual logic through the work, as a simple idea and clear visual identity is manifested in mark, line, fibre and structure.
This is something to continue to explore in future courses. Refined work can be presented more formally and crisply, as you have done in the collections book, so consider the sketchbook a place to test and make errors, as well as documenting as you have done.

Learning Logs or Blogs/Critical essays
Context, reflective thinking, critical thinking, analysis
Overall, your log presents an analytical, structured approach to synthesising inspiration and practice.


My reflection on the feedback, above.

Good

  • Work is well presented, clearly documented and developed playfully.
  • Summary of previous visual research useful.
  • Contextual research relevant and sourced from a range of artists and designers, especially study of their processes as well as outcomes.
  • Photographic compositions provided good visual research (colour and form).
  • Good range of media explored in drawings, and good mixture of representational/more graphic work.
  • Paper manipulations produced surfaces with interest, relevance to the subject and value. These were well photographed in different lights. Evaluative drawings were useful.
  • Paper manipulations with stitch showed sensitivity to texture and pattern. Design drawing ideas well explored.
  • Playful linear concept samples: those exhibiting negative space as part of their form were the most successful.
  • Logical summary and review of work gathered and created as visual research.
  • Clear development of ideas and themes, with increasing time spent on later samples.
  • Material qualities well explored. (Use of found materials, manipulation of materials.)
  • Development of multiple iterations of an idea led to best outcomes.
  • Good use of restraint and subtlety in Catkin sample #10; experimentation with surface and form in tulip and plum tree samples.
  • Logical decision-making when selecting processes for final collection. Surface qualities well translated in final collection. Clear visual logic through the work. Coherent collection with potential for interior context. Clear visual identity.
  • Beautifully presented work (Collections Book).
  • Learning Log presents analytical, structured approach to synthesising inspiration and practice.

Needs Work

  • Not enough experimental drawing (eg my lawnmower drawing).
  • Playful, structural elements not incorporated into final collection. Too traditional? Loss of delicacy and subtlety compared to earlier samples.
  • Lack of organic development shown in sketchbook.

To Do

  • Carry out more experimental drawing.
  • When using the camera, zoom in to focus on details and different angles, as well as the overall composition.
  • More drawings focused on surfaces that fill the page, and of selected elements of the subject.
  • Use my sketchbook to test and make errors, as well as for documenting the work carried out.

Development Notes

  • Drawing: explore the boundaries of drawing. Draw more often and focus on details and textures, as well as line and form.
  • Research: continue to study a wide range of artists and designers.
  • Development: use more drawing and notes in a single sketchbook to show the development process. Make more variations on a theme at the sample-making stage. Keep introducing constraints, where appropriate.
  • Sketchbook: explore work during the development stage rather than simply presenting drawings (ie include ideas, notes, decisions, intuitive responses, etc).
  • Evaluation and Reflection: use drawing to evaluate work created. Continue to regularly pause and reflect on what works and what doesn’t.

Summary

I was pleased with my feedback, which I felt was positive overall. I had made a concerted effort to carry out more drawing and sample-making throughout the process, and will now strive to add notes, ideas and decision-making into that book, rather than purely reflecting in my learning log. Drawing seems to be the key to this creative endeavour, and I will aim to include more variety and experimentation in this area.

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