Assignment 5: Self Evaluation: Performance Against Assessment Criteria

Demonstration of technical and visual skills
Materials – use of both traditional and atypical materials, eg, nail varnish, wax and plastic.
Techniques – exploring a diverse range of media and techniques (eg, drawing with paint, nail varnish, wax, paper cuts etc; melting, stretching and cutting plastic; cutting, printing, bleaching, painting, embroidery, batik, layering, appliqué, couching, needle punching, etc used in textile creation. Book-making to present work.
Observational Skills – drawing from primary sources and for evaluative and planning purposes. Evaluating and selecting work throughout the development process.
Visual Awareness – selection of appropriate media and colour palettes when drawing and creating yarn and textile samples. Selection of elements from drawings to develop further.
Design and Compositional Skills – picking the motifs, marks, patterns, materials and colours to use. Developing a coherent capsule collection appropriate to its proposed end use; and following a logical development path. Creation of a presentation book.
Quality of outcome
Content – choosing which samples to develop further and include in the presentation book. The book also illustrates my design process.
Application of Knowledge – the lessons learnt so far on the course came together in Part 5 – eg, how to:- carry out relevant research; select primary sources to arrange and draw from; selection of appropriate media; abstracting elements of drawings to develop into paper and stitch manipulations, yarns and then textiles; regular evaluation and reflection throughout the process.
Presentation of Work – work has been simply presented in a workbook and textile collection book, demonstrating the flow of the design process. Larger samples and drawings are presented separately.
Demonstration of creativity
Imagination – using the drawings to suggest appropriate techniques and designs for use in the created textiles.
Experimentation – some unusual materials have been used where appropriate (eg, melted plastic to represent the chard leaf drawing); small samples have been created to test ideas, materials or colour combinations (eg, paint-on dye sampling; tulip motif samples).
Invention – the patterns and motifs used are all developed from my drawings and samples. Making textiles (coursework) that could be layered allowed unusual mixtures of colour, texture and materials (eg, cut plastic layered over batik fabric).
Personal Voice – use of simple, abstract motifs, textures and patterns, inspired by nature; paired with strong colour contrasts, flat colour and uncluttered designs represents my ideas and voice exactly.
Context
Reflection – continued reflection on my research, progress, ideas, experiments and outcomes in my learning log; and through the use of evaluative drawings.
Research – focused research has been very useful for Part 5: looking at drawing techniques; artists’ working practices; textile design processes; current design trends; as well as exhibition visits and lectures that proved to be timely and appropriate.
Learning Log – research, course and assignment work, and reflections are recorded in my learning log blog.

Assignment 5: Building A Collection: Written Reflection

What have I learned from observing and developing yarns and textiles?

  • drawing from primary sources is a necessary starting point to gather original material for making future developmental work unique
  • researching other artists’ and designers’ work provides ideas for new directions to take your work in
  • similarly to yarns, textiles can be infinitely varied by playing with colour palette, pattern, motif, scale, fabric weight and opacity and the treatments applied (eg printing, batik, embroidery etc)
  • revisiting earlier coursework refreshed my memory about ideas, techniques and processes that I could use and also aided evaluation of what had gone before, and how it could inform current work
  • one design could be adapted to suit many end uses, from textiles for the craft market, to fashion, to interiors. Techniques applied and materials used can be varied to suit a luxury, mid or mass market
  • considering the context of the textiles is helpful in determining the scale of the design and type of pattern that is suitable to the end use
  • experimenting with a single type of fabric provides knowledge of what is possible with that material

Strong points of my work

Experimental approach; varied research; a variety of techniques used to create a related set of ‘mix and match’ textiles inspired by plants. Simple presentation of my developmental process in a book format. A workbook keeps research, inspirations and unused ideas ready for future reference.

Weaker aspects of my work

I felt that I was rushing through the textile creation phase due to time constraints, and would have liked to spend longer exploring possible variations and developments for the textiles. I think that I should have concentrated on just the final six textiles in the presentation book, but I had already mounted the earlier samples before beginning Assignment 5, so I just had photographic references to show that part of the development process.

New skills

I re-acquainted myself with batik and paint-on dye techniques. I aimed to work in a productive and logical way in creating these textiles, using sampling and drawing to achieve this. Thinking about the context of the capsule collection was helpful in determining suitable materials to work with, and the scale of the patterns required.

Potential work in future based on this project

The potential for printed and batik fabrics is exciting, and I can imagine combining these with stitch and rug making techniques to produce interesting wall art. I enjoyed the bold, flat colour and non-fraying aspect of felt and will use that fabric again. The whole development process has illustrated the importance of gathering original source material; carrying out related research; making samples, exploring materials and combinations thereof; drawing, evaluating and reflecting on the work at every stage; revisiting earlier work; pushing the sample-making and ideas further than my first thoughts, and these are all techniques that I will incorporate into my practice.

Assignment 5: Your Capsule Collection

I started this Assignment with a review of the coursework created for Part 5, and took time to consider the context of the collection I was going to put together.

As I had been working through the coursework, I thought that several of the designs could be adapted to work well in felt, which could then be used in household decor, such as cushion covers or wall hangings. I decided to apply some constraints to the created textiles: they would all be in felt (some with embellishments in other materials) and would feature white, green and pink from my originally selected colour palette.

P1290733
Drawing #10 colour palette

I carried out some research into current trends in interior decor on amara.com, vogue.com, telegraph.co.uk, thatssogemma.com and pantone.com. I was pleased to see that Pantone’s colour of the year is ‘Greenery‘ – a yellowish green that is a slightly darker tone of the green in my palette (which was originally derived from tulip colours).

The white, pink and green from the palette have a fresh, Spring/Summer appeal with strong contrasts and a connection to flowers and the white of summer clothing, white interiors, and weddings (the ideal wedding gift!). It also has a cheerful and light-hearted feel to it, while the warm, fuzzy feel of the felt gives a comforting, cozy, homely element to the created textiles.

Other trends that I thought I might be able to incorporate into some of my designs included:- tropical; texture; geometrics; natural materials; varied patterns; romance; eco-friendly interiors; and plant motifs.

I made some drawings of ideas for further development.

Textile #1 – “Scribble”

This has come a long way from the source material of tulips. This idea was one that I went back to: Yarn Concept #1 and the subsequent drawing of it. I tried a couple of samples. The first was machine sewn, but I found the thread was not bold enough for my liking so I changed to couched yarn. I thought that this was quite successful and I could imagine it as a handmade cushion for the luxury market or as a printed textile for the mass market.

Textile #2 – “White Bamboo”

This textile was again derived from the tulip drawings and subsequent plastic manipulations, and this evaluation drawing, in particular. My husband gave me the idea for this name, when he said that it reminded him of bamboo.

The construction involves cutting the white layer with a scalpel; sewing it to a layer of green felt, then using large hand couching stitches to secure the two layers while adding the pink highlights.

I liked this textile and felt it could be used in a similar way to Textile #1 – handmade or converted to a print version.

Textile #3 – “Flower Net”

This pattern emerged when I was drawing ideas. It flowed from the idea for Textile #2, but as a regular, rather than a random pattern. I remembered making a net yarn for 4.2/3. I initially tried it with strips of felt, but they did not lie flat or change direction in the way that the cotton cord I eventually used, did. The buttons perform the function of holding the cord in place, as well as providing a focal point embellishment to the design. The hardest thing about this was getting all the measurements correct for placement of the cord and buttons to make a regular grid. The resulting textile has a geometric look to it, and combines that with the floral theme that is on trend for this year’s designs.

Textile #4 – “Pink Catkin”

This textile was a development from Textile #10 from the last part of the coursework. That was a mixture of textile marker marks with needle-punched embroidery thread in a small scale pattern. I enlarged the scale, added colour and made the imagery more abstract for this piece. I tried needle-punching on felt, but it didn’t work at all, so I had to inset monk’s cloth areas into the felt. I like the contrast in textures (another of this year’s trends) and colour. I made the pink areas too large (the monk’s cloth seems to stretch when needle-punched – something to bear in mind for future projects). I liked the contrasting textures and there is the possibility of changing the length of the looped yarn; cutting it to produce a velvet-like texture; and using all sorts of yarns and even fine strips of fabric using this method. I can imagine producing wall hangings with textured areas combined with patchwork or plain fabrics such as this example.

Textile #5 – “Blossom”

This piece was a more regular version of the paper and textile manipulations inspired by the plum blossom drawing.

I tried various sizes, layouts and petal types on rough paper before making a template for this one. The petals were hand drawn in slightly different sizes to give an irregular look to the piece. I did not want it to look ‘machine-made’. The white felt was cut with a scalpel and scissors to make the petals, before layering with the pink felt. I debated about adding centres to the flowers, and made a few tiny samples, but felt that the simple version was more successful. The petals fall outwards to reveal the under layer when the fabric is vertical, so it would be best suited to cushions, room dividers etc. Having said that I wanted it to look ‘handmade’, I think that this could be manufactured with a laser cutting service.

Textile #6 – “Magenta Tulips”

Derived from Textile #3 from the previous set of samples. I had envisioned this design made from velvet ribbon, but my sample wasn’t satisfactory, so I tried a few variations in felt. The heads alone looked as if they needed a stem in this iteration, so I took the opportunity to add a touch of the green from the palette. I attached the ‘petals’ so that they were slightly 3-D, but in retrospect, I think they would have been better flat. Each one was attached in a slightly different layout, so that the end result was not too uniform. I liked this simplified tulip and will probably use it on future projects. The basic flower head could be arranged in various patterns, printed or appliquéd.

The Plantasia Textiles Capsule Collection

The work will be presented in two books:- a workbook with some of the drawings, samples and notes in it, and a “Plantasia” presentation book showing the development work carried out for the 10 textiles samples made during the coursework, and a short section showing how these were then developed for the capsule collection (above). The capsule collection are 30 cm square samples, so will be labelled and presented separately, as will the larger drawings and paper manipulations.

Coursework Part 54

sample pages from workbook (above)

Coursework Part 55

sample pages from “plantasia textile collection” presentation book (above)

Summary

This has been a satisfying conclusion to the earlier experiments, and I feel that the six created textiles hang together as a collection, connected by the materials, colour palette, source material and some common techniques (appliqué, hand stitch, couching, cutting, layering etc). The context of designs for interiors helped to focus my efforts on a simple combination of contrasting colours and bold patterns that would work on cushions or wall hangings, for example.

What have I learnt during this Assignment?

  • thinking about the intended use of the created textiles made me think about suitable materials and techniques for the end product
  • working with a limited set of materials, colours and techniques led to new avenues for exploration and pointed to the best way forward for development
  • samples have again been useful in showing successful scales, techniques and colour combinations
  • four of these ideas evolved from a single source (the tulip drawings), so I can see the benefits from gathering lots of source material from first hand observation and drawing, and continuing to draw throughout the design process

References:-

Websites:-

https://www.amara.com/ Accessed 24/5/17 – 01/06/17

https://www.pantone.com/pages/pantone/index.aspx Accessed 25/5/17 – 01/06/17

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/ Accessed 25/5/17 – 01/06/17

http://thatssogemma.com/ Accessed 25/5/17 – 01/06/17

http://www.vogue.co.uk/?international Accessed 25/5/17 – 01/06/17

Coursework Part 5: Project 2: Building A Response: Research

I borrowed several books from the library featuring the work of David Hockney and Vincent van Gogh because I admire the lively and colourful way that those artists depict flowers in their artwork, but felt that their work did not really represent the direction that I feel drawn to, of simplified or abstract landscapes and plants based on observation. I therefore identified a few artists and a jeweller that I feel are working in a way that I feel empathy with. So although these artists do not all depict flowers or plants, their way of working is something that I wished to examine.

Sarah Symes is a Canadian artist, who has also lived and worked in the UK and USA, but is now in Squamish, Canada. She trained and worked in graphic design before becoming a professional artist.

Sarah Symes (titles added to each image)

Source:- http://sarahsymes.com

Sarah works by cutting textiles into the shapes she requires, pinning them to a base textile, before machine sewing the pieces into position. The image shown at right, above, was digitally designed and printed onto banners and was one of three award-winning designs that she produced for display in her local town.

The artist describes her working process as beginning with sketching. She then selects forms which suggest the landscapes she is depicting and aims to depict feelings, memories and emotions through her chosen colour palette. Textiles are purchased, washed and some are hand dyed to suit her requirements. The finished artworks are built up in “… an improvised process, like painting or collage, enabling the gradual build up of colour and texture.”

I like this artist’s work because the pieces are very evocative of the subject matter she depicts, but allow the viewer to bring their own associations to the shapes and colours she uses. For example, I can see buildings and windows in the Havana piece, and the colours evoke brightly painted buildings, dry earth and sun to me. Others may see something quite different.

 Leisa Rich is a Canadian artist whose work I had seen when researching drawing for this part of the coursework. Her layered work and experimental combinations of media are of particular interest to me.

Leisa Rich, titles appended to each image

Source:- http://monaleisa.com

Leisa takes an experimental approach to her artwork, but states that her favourite techniques are 3-D printing, and free motion machine embroidery. She mentions an interesting, heat-sensitive base material that she enjoys working with, called ‘Fosshape‘, (which I see is out of stock with the UK supplier, but is worth noting for future experimentation). Other materials used by the artist include:- thread, plastics, fabrics, mixed media, and re-purposed waste materials.

The framed pieces shown above are made from two or three layered frames featuring plastic with cutaway areas, stitch and paint or other media. The frames can be recombined in different configurations according to the viewer’s whim. The layering gives an added dimension to the artwork, and I like the simple method of presentation, and the technique of building an artwork out of smaller units.

Her artist’s statement has a touching story of how she came to make art. In it she says “… it is art I come back to, to notice, to capture, to recreate that feeling” [of a peaceful childhood in which she noticed everything]. Tiny objects which are often ignored are recreated in her art, through suggested structures, forms and textures.

I came to see Anna Gordon‘s jewellery through reading Kyra Cane’s book “Making & Drawing”. Stylised versions of plants, with abstract additions in some cases, have lingered in my memory.

Anna Gordon

Sources:- http://www.annagordon.com and Cane, 2012

Anna draws on all sorts of sources in her environment for inspiration, including nature and the repeated motifs found in textiles such as Japanese silks. She sketches her ideas before making the pieces by hand, trying to capture the quality of her drawn lines. Thought is given to how the “sketch” (ie, jewellery) will appear on the body, causing light reflections, shadows, movement and contrasts. The artist works with simplified organic and geometric forms in metal, combined with natural media, gemstones and/or enamel.

I find these reinterpretations of natural forms very successful, and the strange little additions give a moment of added surprise. The artist’s method of development, trying to capture the nature of her drawings in a new media is particularly pertinent to the forthcoming projects in the coursework.

Philip Hughes is an artist interested in landscape and the affect of man on that landscape. His work includes paintings, drawings, murals, rugs and tapestries. I recently discovered his work in the form of a book called “Patterns in the Landscape: The Notebooks of Philip Hughes“. I was captivated by his drawings and notes made in situ, showing landscapes in the UK, Australia, Iceland and the USA, amongst others. He worked, at that time, on recycled brown paper sketchbooks in pencil, making linear, contour drawing-type marks to describe the view in front of him. Small amounts of painted colour are added for later reference when making the finished artworks. I loved the look of the flat colour and pencil lines on the textured brown paper so much that I have ordered a kraft paper sketchbook (which I hope will be similar) to try for myself (and the paper seems appropriately ‘earthy’ in texture for representing plant life upon). In Philip’s drawings, some of the land forms are quite recognisable, but others evolve into abstract patterns. The colour palettes are very evocative of the particular country (or area of the country) depicted, and together with the artist’s notes (which might mention the weather, an animal seen, or details about the location) make a fascinating journal of his travels.

Philip Hughes

Source:- http://www.philiphughesart.com

Colour palettes and carefully observed forms in the landscape seem to be key to this artist’s work.

Yesterday I went to the New Quilting exhibition at the Rheged centre in Cumbria. The work of textile artist, Janet Twinn was particularly relevant to this part of the coursework. For the art quilt shown below, the artist made a number of drawings and took photographs of garden plants to inform the shapes she would use in the piece. She then considered the colour palette. Janet dyes her own fabrics and/or paints or prints them, and keeps records in a separate technical book. In her artist’s statement, Janet says that colour is the most important aspect of her work, and that she is interested in its “… emotional effect on our senses and in how it can convey mood and atmosphere.”

Janet Twinn, Green Blooms, and developmental work for the piece

I felt that this art quilt was successful in conveying a sense of vibrancy and growth both in the use of colour and in the suggested plant forms. The palette used has analogous greens, including muted shades, combined with contrasting orange and purple from the secondary triads of the hue continuum. The use of hand coloured and decorated fabrics allows the artist control over the pattern and colours she creates.

Summary

What can I learn from these artists?

Sarah Symes – begin with sketching from first hand source material. Consider the forms used (representative of the source material), and colour palette (what associations does it evoke?).

Leisa Rich – take the time to notice small details (through use of the sketchbook and careful observation). Adopt an experimental approach and consider using new technologies and novel methods of presentation. Build a large artwork from smaller units. Consider the possibilities offered by layering and compositions that can be reconfigured.

Anna Gordon – concentrate on drawing from source material, then capturing the nature of that drawing in the new media (ie, paper, yarn and textiles, for me). Consider mixing unexpected elements with natural forms, such as geometric shapes.

Philip Hughes – make carefully studied drawings from first hand observation of source material. Keep notes and colour samples for future reference. Develop abstract forms from accurately rendered sketches.

Janet Twinn – use drawings and photographs of directly observed source materials. Use further drawing and painting to simplify and develop designs and colour palettes. Consider altering materials to your exact requirements.


References:-

Books:-

Cane, K Making & Drawing, 2012, Bloomsbury, London, pp 14 – 17

Hughes, P Patterns in the Landscape: The Notebooks of Philip Hughes, 1998, Thames and Hudson, London

Websites:-

http://www.annagordon.com/gallery?dsc_0109-jpg Accessed 18/04/17

http://www.janettwinn.co.uk/artist.html Accessed 19/04/17

http://monaleisa.com/ Accessed 18/04/17

https://www.parkinfabrics.co.uk/fosshape-300r.html Accessed 18/04/17

http://www.philiphughesart.com Accessed 18/04/17

https://www.rheged.com/event/new-quilting/ Accessed 19/04/17

http://sarahsymes.com Accessed 18/04/17

Part 5: Research

For this research, I will focus on the developmental work of these artists.

Jenny Ellery is a textile artist whose work explores the human silhouette as a format for presenting her art, which comprises machine embroidery, printed textiles and handmade textiles. It focuses on the work of the textile designer in fashion, and reminds me somewhat of Marie O’Connor‘s work in that it references the body as a canvas that can have the outline distorted and decorated in infinite ways. Coincidentally, I found these images in the newspaper today, which also show ways of ornamenting and changing the human body, which are perhaps part of the wider context for this idea, and for fashion, jewellery and make-up in general.

african photos

Mario Gerth, photographs of members of the Suri tribe, Ethiopia

Source:- scanned image from The Times newspaper, pp 38-39, 01/04/17

Jenny Ellery’s practice involves “Hands-on and intuitive experimentation…”, from which the artist can make new and interesting discoveries. On her website, she mentions working from 2D to 3D and back again, which echoes the advice in our course guide, and via tutor feedback, for drawing, sample making and more drawing in the developmental process.

Jenny’s tumblr account feed shows some inspiring images illustrating her developmental work.

Jenny Ellery RCA MA Textiles

Jenny Ellery RCA MA Textiles // dye tests

Jenny Ellery Source:- http://jennyellery.tumblr.com/

The artist’s practice seems to involve gathering source images on an inspiration board (prints of other artists’ work, for example), taking photographs, drawing, making samples including mixed media and stitch on textile, and making painted colour palettes. (This is sounding familiar as I work through the Textiles 1 course!)

Chris Ofili is a British artist, now living and working in Trinidad. He won the Turner Prize in 1998 and was one of the ‘Young British Artists’ to exhibit in the Sensation exhibition of 1999.

He has explored many themes, such as religion, black history, nature, high and low culture, through the medium of mixed media, painting, prints, drawings and, more recently, woven textiles.

He sees his studio as a laboratory, where he has experimented in the past with a variety of media (elephant dung, paint, resin, collage, map pins and glitter), and assorted techniques.

His practice seems to me to involve phases of interest, which culminate in an exhibition, before he launches into new fields of exploration. At one time, he made a watercolour painting each day (exhibited at the Studio Museum, Harlem in 2005), after that he moved to making more use of sketchbooks, and photography to record his environment in Trinidad, and drawing to test ideas that will become finished artworks. He describes this approach as giving his pictures “… a more automatic, stream-of-consciousness approach.”

Chris Ofili Studio

Source:- https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2010/jan/16/chris-ofili-gary-younge-interview

I have reflected on Chris’s quote about the studio being a laboratory, here.

Alicia Galer is a London-based textile artist and designer. Her development method is to make expressionist-style drawings, from which she selects marks and textures to produce further drawings and patterns.

In an interview with Grafik the artist describes deriving inspiration from travel, interiors, fashion, photography and graphic design. She draws one or more of her source inspirations, then simplifies elements of that drawing to develop further. Alicia favours oil pastels, marker pens, colouring pencils and acrylic paint as her chosen media.

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Alicia Galer, illustration for House of Plants, 2016

Source:- https://www.grafik.net/category/talent/alicia-galer

Josh Blackwell is an American artist and teacher based in Brooklyn, New York. The artist’s interest in the throwaway consumer culture led him to gather plastic bags from various sources, which were incorporated into his studio practice, working with mixed media, painting, sculpture, performance art and installation. The tension between convenience and excess being one focus for his work. Trained as a painter, his use of thread and textile to embellish the plastic bags shows similar mark-making. The finished pieces are transformed from a vilified and discarded piece of rubbish into a playful, colourful and highly textured art work.

Josh Blackwell, Neveruses (Siemensstrasse), 2015, plastic bags, wool, silk, twine, acrylic yarn

Source:- http://www.joshblackwell.com/index.php?/ongoing/recent-works/

Josh Blackwell Neveruses

Josh Blackwell, Neveruses exhibition (detail), 2016/2017 at The Museum of Arts and Design, New York

Source:- http://madmuseum.org/exhibition/josh-blackwell-neveruses-report-progress

On The Museum of Arts and Design‘s website, it describes the artist’s diverse influences as including Italian futurism, and the outsider art of the American South. In the image above, I can see drawings, collections of objects, patterns and the ubiquitous plastic bag, altered by having holes cut in it, hinting at the types of development work the artist undertakes. Other artworks have included lively and colourful drawings of children’s jumpers, cut out and attached to the gallery wall, Juniors (shown at Kate MacGarry, London, 2010).

Barbara Hepworth made numerous maquettes, drawings, screen prints and full size working models and prototypes of her bronze sculptures. I visited The Hepworth Wakefield on 22 March 2017 and was able to view this fantastic collection in person.

Over 40 plaster or wood, working models and prototypes at different stages of work can be seen. Barbara herself carved back many of these pieces to achieve the surface finish that would represent her ideas. Her tools and drawings illustrate her developmental process. The drawings could be simple, functional, small, line drawings, working out composition and construction. These 2-D diagrams are then made into 3-D models, allowing the artist to refine textures and test patinas before the final bronze sculpture is cast. One exhibit showed an assortment of patina samples that she had commissioned: the equivalent of our ‘sampling’ work on the course. She also made gouache and oil drawings, with pencil marks over the top. She made abstract drawings and drawings from life, such as a series made in a hospital. In quotations on the official Hepworth website, the artist makes it clear that carving was the most important part of the process for her. Once the idea had formed, she could choose the material, but it was the carving rather than the modelling that was important to her, as she could achieve so many variations depending on the material in use, and felt that it allowed her to put her accumulated experience and knowledge into the work. Her selection from the numerous types of stone and wood available, would influence what it was possible to achieve, and only by working with these materials over many years, could she master and exploit their unique properties, “… a complete sensibility to material – an understanding of its inherent quality and character – is required.”

Summary

It has been rather tricky to find details of some of the artists’ processes, as I suspect that they would understandably prefer to keep them private, having honed and refined them for their own use.

What can I learn from these artists?

Jenny Ellery’s ‘hands-on’ work with materials chimes with explorations that I carried out on Part 4 of the course – physically combining materials to find which worked well together (in colour palette, texture and scale). In Part 5 of the course, I will aim to emulate this through sample-making and drawing.

Her use of inspiration boards, colour palettes and drawings will also influence my process for the forthcoming coursework.

From Chris Ofili, I will take an attitude of experimentation and exploration of media.

Alicia Galer’s practice felt like a good fit for what I would like to achieve – making both realistic and more abstract drawings in a variety of media, then selecting and refining aspects of those pieces to take forward. I can imagine using a viewfinder to pick out almost abstract lines and marks from a drawing.

Josh Blackwell’s main focus on one material – plastic bags – links his artwork to the theme of consumerism. I will try to select appropriate grounds and media for my drawings and art work. His use of mixed and unusual media is another point of interest.

Barbara Hepworth gathered inspiration for her work through careful observation and drawing. Her total dedication to her artwork is an inspiration in itself, and I love many of her abstract sculptures with their variations of form, surface and colour. I will continue to derive inspiration from many sources and carry out more drawing and sample-making.

Barbara Hepworth’s intimate knowledge of her media and the effects that could be achieved with that material is something to aspire to. Spending time getting to know and understand my chosen media fully will be an ongoing process.


 

 

References:-

Websites:-

https://barbarahepworth.org.uk/texts/ Accessed 01/04/17

http://www.chrisofiliprints.info/biography.php?cur=EUR Accessed 31/03/17

https://www.grafik.net/category/talent/alicia-galer Accessed 31/03/17

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2010/jan/16/chris-ofili-gary-younge-interview Accessed 31/03/17

http://www.hepworthwakefield.org/collection/the-hepworth-family-gift/ Accessed 01/04/17

http://www.jennyellery.com/ Accessed 31/03/17

http://jennyellery.tumblr.com/ Accessed 31/03/17

http://madmuseum.org/exhibition/josh-blackwell-neveruses-report-progress Accessed 31/03/17

http://www.marieoconnor.co.uk/ Accessed 31/03/17

http://www.nationalgallery.org.uk/whats-on/exhibitions/chris-ofili-weaving-magic?gclid=CP-F4MXdgNMCFQ8TGwodwmwGMw Accessed 31/03/17 (Chris Ofili exhibition)

http://www.tate.org.uk/learn/online-resources/glossary/f/futurism Accessed 31/03/17 (Italian Futurism)

Formative Feedback: Part 4, and Reflection

Thank you to Cari for my latest feedback. Lots to take on board and reflect upon!

Good

  • translation of aesthetic, material and structural qualities of samples into yarn concepts
  • range of shape, form, structure and material investigation in 2D and 3D
  • constraints in colour palette worked well for red, black and white drawings
  • strong crafting skills without over-precision
  • exploration of scale, however, delicate/intricate samples most successful
  • exploration of translucency with hints of colour (eg, ice and hair yarns)
  • interesting use of objects to form yarns (eg, jelly beans and coat hanger yarns)
  • some yarns combine materials into something new and interesting
  • construction and interior of yarn book, crisp and well-organised (minimal use of text)
  • thorough discussion of the journey of the project/decisions made and good evaluative summaries
  • strong drawing work (good use of sympathetic media/techniques to capture material, tactile and visual qualities; quality and nature of drawing varied according to role, eg, functional planning drawings, more fully rendered drawings of samples)

Needs Work

  • close up snake yarn sample felt inelegant and heavy (however, it works at a distance when overall pattern becomes clear)
  • some materials feel as if they are fighting each other, not working together
  • photographs: do they successfully capture and communicate samples? (eg, ice yarn – background of trees too busy)
  • cover of the yarn book not successful (too strong and not my own design)
  • too much technical information in learning log
  • ‘Research & Reflection’ sections confusing to navigate

To Do

  • consider how my samples read spatially and how the viewer may interpret them (eg, snake yarn) [ongoing]
  • reflect on how the materials have been transformed by my interventions when evaluating future work, eg, two intertwined materials – are they integrated and transformed into something new? [ongoing]
  • photograph samples sympathetically against a neutral background (show different lighting options and how they may change a piece) [all work now photographed against white backgrounds, eg, images of workbook from Assignment 5]
  • present work in a visually quiet way, or use aesthetic details from the contents to hint at what’s within (redo covers of both yarn book and colour book) [latest book cover can be seen in this photo collage]
  • use neutral grey for presenting light coloured work, rather than black [ongoing]
  • emphasise evaluative commentary over descriptive commentary (ie, more about the aesthetic/visual read of samples) [ongoing]
  • refer to evaluative summaries in learning log when working on Part 5 [Review of coursework and feedback here]
  • integrate research and reflection with the relevant coursework and assignment work in the learning log [all relevant research is now linked both to the coursework and assignment parts and can be reached by clicking on those links on the side bar, as well as through the Research link. The latter link also has other personal research included.]
  • move ‘yarn research file’ to the beginning of the Part 4 Coursework section [it was not possible to insert a blog article at an earlier date, so I have added the yarn research file to the research article for Part 4]
  • use more appropriate drawing media for proposed samples (helps to assess aesthetic qualities of resulting samples) [ongoing, eg, tulip on tracing paper; blossom on tissue paper; chard leaf in melted plastic]
  • more sketchbook work for Part 5 (extensive drawing to capture samples, as well as planning for them; visual/theoretical/contextual research to underpin and inform the sampling) [ongoing – some pages from my latest sketchbook]
  • keep working both inside a sketchbook and on other appropriate grounds outside the sketchbook (small sections of coloured paper can be stuck into the sketchbook)
  • view Cari’s Pinterest boards on sketchbooks, drawing for textiles and design research [my own Pinterest boards for sketchbooks and textiles inspiration have been updated with some of Cari’s suggestions, and some other examples that I find inspiring. I found this website through a link on Pinterest, which has a useful guide to making an art portfolio with some ideas of what to include in sketchbooks. Interestingly, I had just seem some excellent examples at Gracefield Arts Centre‘s exhibition of Advanced Higher Art Selection, such as the work shown below by one of the students.]

 

Megan Nodwell, development work for, and images of finished wearable art jewellery

Development Notes

A big area for future development for me is use of the sketchbook. I need to show in images (photographs, pictures from magazines, books and the internet, etc) and in sketches, where my inspiration for work originates, and how I have selected and refined my ideas, along with technical notes and experiments, samples, colour palettes etc. Then drawings for planning the projects, using appropriate media, grounds and techniques, and evaluative drawings of samples and finished pieces.

Another area for improvement is to present my work even more simply, with regards to the backgrounds in photographs (neutral and plain), and in the covers for my books (simple and plain, or more appropriate to the contents).

One of my first tasks will be to go back to the beginning of my Learning Log, and add links for the research to the relevant parts of each section of coursework and assignments, and to move the yarn research file.

In future written work, I need reflect evaluatively on the processes I have used and on the work produced, together with weighing its aesthetic appeal, (Rebecca Fairley’s article “How to look at textiles” will come in useful here). I need to write less about the technical aspects of the work: I will keep the majority of these notes in my technical notebook. I have re-read my summaries for Part 4 and made notes to refer to in Part 5.


 

References:-

Websites:-

Accessed 25/03/17

http://www.dumgal.gov.uk/gracefield Accessed 25/03/17

http://www.studentartguide.com/articles/how-to-make-an-art-portfolio-for-college-or-university Accessed 25/03/17

https://weareoca.com/textiles/how-to-look-at-textiles/ Accessed 26/03/17

 

Assignment 4: Self Evaluation: Performance Against Assessment Criteria

Demonstration of technical and visual skills

Materials – use of traditional and unusual materials, eg, toy snakes in Ex 4.3.

Techniques – colour analysis, colour palette selection and reproduction in yarn, abstracting elements from source materials to develop as yarn concepts, selecting, combining and joining a variety of media, designing, laying out and assembling a yarns book (YB).

Observational Skills – used in all of the exercises, eg evaluating paper and stitch samples for colour palettes and textures, to be translated into drawings and developed into yarns.

Visual Awareness – choices made for colour palettes, patterns and textures, eg, the clear plastic tubing cut into rings for Ex 4.4 represented the grey/white colour palette and the circular objects of the glass arrangement.

Design and Compositional Skills – selecting the size, layout, covers, labelling font, content and order of presentation for the YB, and assembling the book.

Quality of outcome

Content – selection of yarn ideas to create, derived from drawings made from source materials; choosing particular samples to pursue and develop (eg, the coiled sample led to a coiled pot and so to a snake vessel).

Application of Knowledgeresearch on basketry techniques and the work of designers fed into my work on this part of the course. Eg, Lucy Brown‘s use of hair in her artwork inspired my hair yarn.

Presentation of Work – the YB presents my work in a simple, clear, logical layout, presenting the created yarns in the order of the exercises, adjacent to the inspirational images.

Demonstration of creativity

Imagination – eg, using ice to make an ephemeral yarn; including surprise elements of sound, smell and taste in the YB. Using drawing, sampling, mind maps and play with materials to explore ideas. Linking snakes as media to the source image.

Experimentation – eg:- using unusual materials (jelly beans, glass buttons, coat hangers, etc); different scales of work (eg, French knitted linear concept on a large scale, gesso-dipped yarn on a smaller scale); different techniques (net making, binding, machine sewing, knotting, weaving, coilingorigami, etc) have all been explored.

Invention – Altering materials (eg, fraying, cutting, melting, painting, dipping, etc); and combining unusual materials (eg, washers/twigs/yarn, slate/pebbles/thread, wooden snakes/gardening wire, etc) have enabled me to approach the subject from a new direction.

Personal Voice –I feel that my selection of source materials, colour palette choices and combinations of media used, demonstrate an emerging distinctive identity.

Context

Reflection – I have continued to reflect on and evaluate my ideas and work in my learning log. I have carried out more drawing and sampling during this coursework, and have found it helpful in focusing my attention on successful outcomes.

Research – The artist/designer recommendations made by my tutor, have led to research on colour that has felt very exciting in suggesting ways of developing and presenting my work. The research carried out for the coursework also helped to inform my choices, and expand my expectations of what was possible.

Learning Log – I have recorded my research, course and assignment work and reflections in my learning log blog.