Assignment 5: Self Evaluation: Performance Against Assessment Criteria

Demonstration of technical and visual skills
Materials – use of both traditional and atypical materials, eg, nail varnish, wax and plastic.
Techniques – exploring a diverse range of media and techniques (eg, drawing with paint, nail varnish, wax, paper cuts etc; melting, stretching and cutting plastic; cutting, printing, bleaching, painting, embroidery, batik, layering, appliqué, couching, needle punching, etc used in textile creation. Book-making to present work.
Observational Skills – drawing from primary sources and for evaluative and planning purposes. Evaluating and selecting work throughout the development process.
Visual Awareness – selection of appropriate media and colour palettes when drawing and creating yarn and textile samples. Selection of elements from drawings to develop further.
Design and Compositional Skills – picking the motifs, marks, patterns, materials and colours to use. Developing a coherent capsule collection appropriate to its proposed end use; and following a logical development path. Creation of a presentation book.
Quality of outcome
Content – choosing which samples to develop further and include in the presentation book. The book also illustrates my design process.
Application of Knowledge – the lessons learnt so far on the course came together in Part 5 – eg, how to:- carry out relevant research; select primary sources to arrange and draw from; selection of appropriate media; abstracting elements of drawings to develop into paper and stitch manipulations, yarns and then textiles; regular evaluation and reflection throughout the process.
Presentation of Work – work has been simply presented in a workbook and textile collection book, demonstrating the flow of the design process. Larger samples and drawings are presented separately.
Demonstration of creativity
Imagination – using the drawings to suggest appropriate techniques and designs for use in the created textiles.
Experimentation – some unusual materials have been used where appropriate (eg, melted plastic to represent the chard leaf drawing); small samples have been created to test ideas, materials or colour combinations (eg, paint-on dye sampling; tulip motif samples).
Invention – the patterns and motifs used are all developed from my drawings and samples. Making textiles (coursework) that could be layered allowed unusual mixtures of colour, texture and materials (eg, cut plastic layered over batik fabric).
Personal Voice – use of simple, abstract motifs, textures and patterns, inspired by nature; paired with strong colour contrasts, flat colour and uncluttered designs represents my ideas and voice exactly.
Context
Reflection – continued reflection on my research, progress, ideas, experiments and outcomes in my learning log; and through the use of evaluative drawings.
Research – focused research has been very useful for Part 5: looking at drawing techniques; artists’ working practices; textile design processes; current design trends; as well as exhibition visits and lectures that proved to be timely and appropriate.
Learning Log – research, course and assignment work, and reflections are recorded in my learning log blog.

Assignment 5: Building A Collection: Written Reflection

What have I learned from observing and developing yarns and textiles?

  • drawing from primary sources is a necessary starting point to gather original material for making future developmental work unique
  • researching other artists’ and designers’ work provides ideas for new directions to take your work in
  • similarly to yarns, textiles can be infinitely varied by playing with colour palette, pattern, motif, scale, fabric weight and opacity and the treatments applied (eg printing, batik, embroidery etc)
  • revisiting earlier coursework refreshed my memory about ideas, techniques and processes that I could use and also aided evaluation of what had gone before, and how it could inform current work
  • one design could be adapted to suit many end uses, from textiles for the craft market, to fashion, to interiors. Techniques applied and materials used can be varied to suit a luxury, mid or mass market
  • considering the context of the textiles is helpful in determining the scale of the design and type of pattern that is suitable to the end use
  • experimenting with a single type of fabric provides knowledge of what is possible with that material

Strong points of my work

Experimental approach; varied research; a variety of techniques used to create a related set of ‘mix and match’ textiles inspired by plants. Simple presentation of my developmental process in a book format. A workbook keeps research, inspirations and unused ideas ready for future reference.

Weaker aspects of my work

I felt that I was rushing through the textile creation phase due to time constraints, and would have liked to spend longer exploring possible variations and developments for the textiles. I think that I should have concentrated on just the final six textiles in the presentation book, but I had already mounted the earlier samples before beginning Assignment 5, so I just had photographic references to show that part of the development process.

New skills

I re-acquainted myself with batik and paint-on dye techniques. I aimed to work in a productive and logical way in creating these textiles, using sampling and drawing to achieve this. Thinking about the context of the capsule collection was helpful in determining suitable materials to work with, and the scale of the patterns required.

Potential work in future based on this project

The potential for printed and batik fabrics is exciting, and I can imagine combining these with stitch and rug making techniques to produce interesting wall art. I enjoyed the bold, flat colour and non-fraying aspect of felt and will use that fabric again. The whole development process has illustrated the importance of gathering original source material; carrying out related research; making samples, exploring materials and combinations thereof; drawing, evaluating and reflecting on the work at every stage; revisiting earlier work; pushing the sample-making and ideas further than my first thoughts, and these are all techniques that I will incorporate into my practice.