Assignment 5: Self Evaluation: Performance Against Assessment Criteria

Demonstration of technical and visual skills
Materials – use of both traditional and atypical materials, eg, nail varnish, wax and plastic.
Techniques – exploring a diverse range of media and techniques (eg, drawing with paint, nail varnish, wax, paper cuts etc; melting, stretching and cutting plastic; cutting, printing, bleaching, painting, embroidery, batik, layering, appliqué, couching, needle punching, etc used in textile creation. Book-making to present work.
Observational Skills – drawing from primary sources and for evaluative and planning purposes. Evaluating and selecting work throughout the development process.
Visual Awareness – selection of appropriate media and colour palettes when drawing and creating yarn and textile samples. Selection of elements from drawings to develop further.
Design and Compositional Skills – picking the motifs, marks, patterns, materials and colours to use. Developing a coherent capsule collection appropriate to its proposed end use; and following a logical development path. Creation of a presentation book.
Quality of outcome
Content – choosing which samples to develop further and include in the presentation book. The book also illustrates my design process.
Application of Knowledge – the lessons learnt so far on the course came together in Part 5 – eg, how to:- carry out relevant research; select primary sources to arrange and draw from; selection of appropriate media; abstracting elements of drawings to develop into paper and stitch manipulations, yarns and then textiles; regular evaluation and reflection throughout the process.
Presentation of Work – work has been simply presented in a workbook and textile collection book, demonstrating the flow of the design process. Larger samples and drawings are presented separately.
Demonstration of creativity
Imagination – using the drawings to suggest appropriate techniques and designs for use in the created textiles.
Experimentation – some unusual materials have been used where appropriate (eg, melted plastic to represent the chard leaf drawing); small samples have been created to test ideas, materials or colour combinations (eg, paint-on dye sampling; tulip motif samples).
Invention – the patterns and motifs used are all developed from my drawings and samples. Making textiles (coursework) that could be layered allowed unusual mixtures of colour, texture and materials (eg, cut plastic layered over batik fabric).
Personal Voice – use of simple, abstract motifs, textures and patterns, inspired by nature; paired with strong colour contrasts, flat colour and uncluttered designs represents my ideas and voice exactly.
Context
Reflection – continued reflection on my research, progress, ideas, experiments and outcomes in my learning log; and through the use of evaluative drawings.
Research – focused research has been very useful for Part 5: looking at drawing techniques; artists’ working practices; textile design processes; current design trends; as well as exhibition visits and lectures that proved to be timely and appropriate.
Learning Log – research, course and assignment work, and reflections are recorded in my learning log blog.

Assignment 4: Self Evaluation: Performance Against Assessment Criteria

Demonstration of technical and visual skills

Materials – use of traditional and unusual materials, eg, toy snakes in Ex 4.3.

Techniques – colour analysis, colour palette selection and reproduction in yarn, abstracting elements from source materials to develop as yarn concepts, selecting, combining and joining a variety of media, designing, laying out and assembling a yarns book (YB).

Observational Skills – used in all of the exercises, eg evaluating paper and stitch samples for colour palettes and textures, to be translated into drawings and developed into yarns.

Visual Awareness – choices made for colour palettes, patterns and textures, eg, the clear plastic tubing cut into rings for Ex 4.4 represented the grey/white colour palette and the circular objects of the glass arrangement.

Design and Compositional Skills – selecting the size, layout, covers, labelling font, content and order of presentation for the YB, and assembling the book.

Quality of outcome

Content – selection of yarn ideas to create, derived from drawings made from source materials; choosing particular samples to pursue and develop (eg, the coiled sample led to a coiled pot and so to a snake vessel).

Application of Knowledgeresearch on basketry techniques and the work of designers fed into my work on this part of the course. Eg, Lucy Brown‘s use of hair in her artwork inspired my hair yarn.

Presentation of Work – the YB presents my work in a simple, clear, logical layout, presenting the created yarns in the order of the exercises, adjacent to the inspirational images.

Demonstration of creativity

Imagination – eg, using ice to make an ephemeral yarn; including surprise elements of sound, smell and taste in the YB. Using drawing, sampling, mind maps and play with materials to explore ideas. Linking snakes as media to the source image.

Experimentation – eg:- using unusual materials (jelly beans, glass buttons, coat hangers, etc); different scales of work (eg, French knitted linear concept on a large scale, gesso-dipped yarn on a smaller scale); different techniques (net making, binding, machine sewing, knotting, weaving, coilingorigami, etc) have all been explored.

Invention – Altering materials (eg, fraying, cutting, melting, painting, dipping, etc); and combining unusual materials (eg, washers/twigs/yarn, slate/pebbles/thread, wooden snakes/gardening wire, etc) have enabled me to approach the subject from a new direction.

Personal Voice –I feel that my selection of source materials, colour palette choices and combinations of media used, demonstrate an emerging distinctive identity.

Context

Reflection – I have continued to reflect on and evaluate my ideas and work in my learning log. I have carried out more drawing and sampling during this coursework, and have found it helpful in focusing my attention on successful outcomes.

Research – The artist/designer recommendations made by my tutor, have led to research on colour that has felt very exciting in suggesting ways of developing and presenting my work. The research carried out for the coursework also helped to inform my choices, and expand my expectations of what was possible.

Learning Log – I have recorded my research, course and assignment work and reflections in my learning log blog.

Assignment 4: Yarn and Linear Exploration: Written Reflection

What have I learned from observing and developing materials and textiles?

  • yarns can be inspired by numerous source materials
  • drawing and mind maps are useful in generating ideas
  • sampling illuminates successful combinations of media, colour palettes, construction methods, possible developments, etc
  • imposing constraints has again been highlighted as a successful strategy
  • the selected colour palette, scale, and type of ‘line’ all help to define the look and feel of a yarn
  • the importance of ways of joining media
  • colour palette and proportions of colours, media, texture, scale and pattern can all be varied to create numerous ideas for yarns

Strong points of my work

Exploration of varied and unusual media, interesting techniques, and scale in yarn creation. Coherent presentation of yarn samples and inspirations in a yarns book.

Weaker aspects of my work

Although I have done more sampling and drawing for this section, I am sure that I could do even more in future. I had ideas that I did not have time to explore, therefore I must aim to work faster.

New skills

I had an introduction to knotting, basketry techniques and net making. Working with plastic (packaging and tubing), toy snakes, ice, hair and 3-D objects were new experiences for me.

Potential work in future based on this project

I am sure that I will return to a number of these techniques in the future: basketry techniques; combining and joining assorted media; French knitting; knotting and binding; making repeating patterns, to name but a few.

Assignment 3: Self Evaluation: Performance Against Assessment Criteria

Demonstration of technical and visual skills

Materials – use of usual and unusual materials, eg, recycled paper used in the monochrome collage; found/made linear media in Yarn Wrap #5.
Techniques – colour analysis, colour palette reproduction in paint, collage, designing, laying out and assembling a colour resource book (CRB).
Observational Skills – used in all of the exercises, eg evaluating textiles for colour palettes, painting watercolour stripes of glass arrangement.
Visual Awarenessselection of glass arrangement; and Old Master subject; seeing potential in a simple scene, for collage.
Design and Compositional Skills – selecting the size, layout, covers, cover decorations, labelling font as well as the subject matter and running order, for the CRB, and assembling the piece.

Quality of outcome

Content – selection of material to be included in the CRB.
Application of Knowledgeresearch on the use of colour palettes and proportions of colour by certain designers fed into my choices for colourful textiles to analyse and the colour palettes selected for collage work.
Presentation of Work – the CRB is arranged in a logical manner, following the learning from the exercises during the coursework for Part Three. I chose to put the Ex 3.3 watercolour analysis of a glass arrangement following the other painted work, leading into the work on linear media, as it felt like a more natural ‘flow’ from painted work to yarn wraps to collage. (Illustrating my learning about colour analysis/reproduction to effects of lighting/proportions of colour, then introducing texture, the importance of tone, value and saturation with the collage work and grey studies and ending with image analysis with found colours (felt pens and textiles)).

Demonstration of creativity

Imagination – eg, coming up with a CRB that fit the criteria of being simple, well presented and expandable.
Experimentation – eg:- trying different lighting effects, backgrounds and compositions with the glass arrangement; using software to suggest ways of altering the collage in colour and through pixellation.
Invention – making and using ‘found’ linear media for Yarn Wrap #5; using different types of paper media (shredded, crushed, sanded/holed, cellophane, painted, magazine print etc) in the collage work.
Personal Voice – choice of colour palettes (often bright!), subject material (eg, for the collage: cat cushion, textile scraps, yarn) is starting to reflect me and my interests.

Context

Reflection – evaluating and reflecting on my learning and what it means for my future work is starting to become ingrained in my practice. Visual evaluation (eg, revision of Assignment 2, and cat cushion drawing) have led to new ideas.
Researchstudying designers and collage artists was extremely useful grounding for this Assignment. I also followed up on my Tutor’s advice for reading (Kleon, 2012 and Tellier – Loumagne, 2005) and this led me to a more wide-ranging study of knitted fabrics and contemporary knitting.
Learning Log – I have recorded a selection of my research, course and assignment work and reflections in my learning log blog.

 

References:-

Books:-

Kleon, A. (2012) Steal like an artist: 10 things nobody told you about being creative. New York: Workman Publishing Company.

Tellier-Loumagne, F. and translated by Black, S. (2005) The art of knitting: Inspirational stitches, textures and surfaces. London: Thames & Hudson.

Assignment 3: Colour Communication: Written Reflection

What have I learned from observing and developing materials and textiles?

  • The importance of tone, value and saturation in conveying a likeness, or an altered version of a subject.
  • The importance of lighting on colour perception.
    increased confidence in selecting colours from subjects
  • The value of imposing constraints when selecting a palette to work from, lending a particular mood/feeling/cohesive look to a piece.
  • Adding proportion and texture to a colour palette with linear media, and how choice and placement of colour can enliven a palette.
  • The usefulness (and limitations) of using software to alter, or select a palette, from an image.
  • How to analyse and reproduce perceived colours in an image/composition using various media.

Strong points of my work

Accuracy of selected gouache palettes derived from textiles; the extended stripy textile in gouache; and some of the collage and yarn wrap work (as selected for the book). See also Summary of this article.

Weaker aspects of my work

General sloppiness, eg, with labelling, smudges on white card etc. Painted gouache was too stripy and not opaque. Numerous attempts to mix correct colours in gouache samples. Tendency to exaggerate colour saturation. Watercolour studies of glass composition showed a lot of mixing between the stripes of colour.

New skills

Working in gouache for the first time, producing opaque, flat colour was a challenge. The yarn wraps were a new exercise for me. I found them useful in representing colour, proportion and texture.

Potential work in future based on this project

I have started to analyse some of my ‘images for inspiration’ to generate colour palettes for translation into paint and textiles. I am working on an image of fishing crates on a harbour wall to be turned into an abstracted image.

Assignment 2: Self-Evaluation: Performance Against Assessment Criteria

1 Demonstration of technical and visual skills

I experimented with a wide variety of techniques in the paper manipulations (embossing, dipping, cutting, tearing, collage, burning, folding, layering etc). Stitch was added to reflect the marks observed in the selected drawings using all sorts of threads and yarns, including wire, paper cord, elastic and plant material.

I represented the ideas of:- repetition – in the forms used, types of stitch and types of textile manipulation – ; scale – from the tiniest seed stitch (Piece 2) to large tied stitch (Piece 3) -; and placement – from flat areas with delicate stitch, next to areas with medium and high texture (all three textile pieces).

The designs for the textile pieces were worked out in my sketchbook, using small compositional drawings, and drawings exploring stitch placement, colour, and placement of texture.

I took my Tutor’s advice on standing back to look at the whole effect of the pieces, by pinning the works in progress to a cork board.  I feel that this helped in judging how the different areas of the textiles worked against each other.

I felt that I was quite strong on exploration of the media, but that the design and compositional aspects need more practise.

2 Quality of outcome

The three resulting pieces show variety and the use of different techniques, including textile manipulation: forming a grass-like texture in Piece 1, layering and punch needle (Piece 2), using scraps of re-purposed textiles to form the base textile (Piece 3).

I hope that I have presented the work in a coherent manner, with the textiles and samples mounted on mount board; the paper, and paper and stitch manipulations grouped by type, and a folder of labelled sketchbook work. The learning log features my deliberations and process throughout the Projects and Assignment.

Although I was not entirely happy with all three textile pieces, they form a useful body of experiments to inform future work. I feel that they have, for me, embodied my theme of re-wilding, although I think they may need an explanatory label!

3 Demonstration of creativity

The research on artists’ textiles for this Assignment expanded my ideas of materials that could be combined (for example, paint and textile), ways of embellishing, and experimentation with three-dimensional textures and forms.

I chose to take forward the grass drawing as inspiration for the Assignment textiles, and expanded the idea to the theme of ‘re-wilding’, which I felt pushed the textiles into an interesting area that had some personal relevance and meaning.

4 Context

Critical thinking about the work and ideas of other artists, and evaluating  different approaches and techniques, enables me to relate these to my own ideas and work (for example, the tied quilt I spotted in a book informed my third piece of textile work). I feel that this filtering of information has helped me to focus on issues that are important to me, such as the environment, and areas that interest me, such as abstraction.

Assignment 2: Written Reflection

First ideas in response to the brief

Excitement at the thought of paper manipulations, and adding stitch to paper – both new techniques for me.

First impression of the Assignment

Cari had suggested more cutting into textured surfaces, so I picked the grass drawing as an inspiration for the Assignment. This led to a theme of ‘Re-wilding’.

Techniques explored

This Assignment has been about exploring the translation of marks made in drawings into paper surfaces, stitch and textured base fabrics. New techniques included, burning, laminating, embossing, dipping, and wax coating. The process of research, thinking, drawing, experimenting, selecting and refining is beginning to become ingrained in the way that I work.

Strong points of my work

The paper (and stitch) manipulations explored a variety of techniques and media. Concentration on the grass drawing resulted in three quite different textiles: monotone (Piece 1), multiple textures (Piece 2), and constraints (rectangles/ knotted white stitches) (Piece 3). I liked aspects of 1 and 2, but thought that Piece 3 was the strongest.

Weaker aspects of my work

I still want to ‘jump in’ without doing the preparatory work of sampling, but I am starting to appreciate the benefits (eg, sampling helped me with techniques for tied stitches; and using paint instead of burning the base fabric in Piece 2). More sketching needed.

New skills

The main skill that I have learned is the usefulness of having a process when making an art work, and being open to play and exploration in the ‘discovery’ stage.

Potential work in future based on this Assignment

I will return to the theme of ‘re-wilding’ in the future, perhaps using more realistic colours. I enjoyed working in an abstract way, branching out into three-dimensions, and using unusual shapes for the artworks.